Recent Breast Cancer Diagnosis

I just found out I have breast cancer. Now what?

After being diagnosed with breast cancer, you may feel overwhelmed with questions and decisions about what to do next. Crighton Olive Dunn Surgical Group wants to encourage you to take this time to meet with our physicians so we can address any and all of your questions and concerns. We want to make it our mission to join your fight against breast cancer and give you the best, most effective treatment for your condition.

Crighton Olive Dunn Surgical Group is hope to the area’s only fellowship-trained breast oncologist, which means that the training, expertise and experience are on our side. To begin your fight against breast cancer, please call us at 417-882-2349.

What are the types of breast cancer?

Breast cancer put simply is the abnormal growth of cells which may originate within the ducts or lobules of the breast, or invade through these structures. The lobules produce milk and the ducts deliver that milk to the nipples after pregnancy. It is important to identify the specific subtype of breast cancer so the patient may receive the appropriate treatment.  

Carcinoma in Situ

This type of cancer is confined to the lobules or ducts and has not spread to other areas of the breast. The two types of carcinoma in situ are ductal carcinoma (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). LCIS is not considered a cancer but a high risk lesion which elevates a women’s risk of developing breast cancer.

Invasive Breast Cancers

Invasive breast cancers are cancers that have grown and are spreading beyond the lobules and ducts in the breast. The cancer has moved beyond the duct wall and penetrated the surrounding fatty tissue. These cancers may continue to spread to the lymph nodes or beyond and would require more advanced treatment. Approximately 10 percent of lobular cancers become invasive while 80% of ductal cancers account for invasive cancers.

It is possible to have other forms of cancer that are considered to be uncommon. These include medullary, metaplastic inflammatory or colloid cancers.

Breast Cancer Staging

When the stage of your breast cancer is diagnosed, it is based if the tumor is invasive or non-invasive, the size of the tumor, if it has spread to the lymph nodes, or to other structures beyond the breast. After the stage of your breast cancer has been determined, our physicians can set forth the appropriate treatments and help you know what to expect during the treatment process. The following are stages of breast cancer used by healthcare professionals:

Stage 0

This is defined as ductal carcinoma in situ, or where the tumor has not invaded into the surrounding tissue.

Stage I

The formation of cancer is confirmed in this stage. The tumor has remained in the breast and is two centimeters or smaller.

Stage IIA

The tumor is between two and five centimeters and confined to the breast.

The tumor is less than two centimeters and has spread to the movable axillary lymph nodes

No tumor is found in the breast, but it has been found in the axillary lymph nodes

Stage IIB

The tumor is between two and five centimeters and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes on the same side of the tumor.

The tumor is bigger than five centimeters but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes

Stage IIIA

Although there is no tumor in the breast, cancer is in the axillary lymph nodes and is attached to each other (matted) or other structures.

The tumor is between two and five centimeters and cancer is in the axillary lymph nodes that are connected to each other or other structures.

The tumor is five centimeters or larger and cancer is in the axillary lymph nodes that could be connected to each other or other structures.

Cancer to internal mammary lymph nodes, but not to axillary lymph nodes

Stage IIIB

The tumor could be any size, but the cancer…

Has spread to the skin of the breast (inflammatory breast cancer and/or the chest wall)

Tumor spread to 4–9 lymph nodes, or clinically positive internal mammary lymph nodes.  

Stage IIIC

Lymph node spread in infraclavicular, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary nodes combines, or in 10 or more axillary lymph nodes.

Stage IV

Cancer has spread to other body organs, typically the lungs, liver, bones or brain.

Testimonials

“I’m so glad the doctor in West Plains couldn’t get me in, I just love everyone in this office.”

—Charlotte | Mtn. Grove

“This place always makes me smile – everyone is so compassionate. Being recently diagnosed with breast cancer the staff were so helpful.”

—Anne | Alton